About your Search

20121201
20121231
SHOW
Book TV 20
Cavuto 4
( more )
STATION
SFGTV 162
SFGTV2 81
CSPAN2 32
CSPAN 30
CNNW 21
MSNBCW 18
KQED (PBS) 16
KTVU (FOX) 14
KGO (ABC) 12
FBC 10
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 7
LINKTV 7
CNN 6
KICU 5
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 496
Search Results 100 to 199 of about 499 (some duplicates have been removed)
relationships with city governments to the point where there is a large regulatory regime in most cities around taxis. in many cases you have regulators who feel their job is to protect the taxi industry. i had one regulator in new york refer to the taxi industry as their customer. so what happens then is that once it goes into that protection mode, innovation becomes very difficult. it may be why in so many cities that innovation around taxi around transportation is so gummed up. the rig heaters who are supposed to crack the whip end up becoming the protectors. even though it's hard, uber is completely legal, in the cities that we're rolling out and there are cities that we can't roll out where we're like miami and vegas we can't roll out. there is that protection mechanism that makes it particularly controversial. >> so you say you're legal but a lot of these cities suggest otherwise. their regulators are sending out crease and desist orders almost on a daily base. impounding cars in washington, d.c. at one point. they're not allowing this technology to take shape. these guys are starting to
of the answer is found in an elaborate system of irrigation, canals that helped the city produce a large agricultural surplus. although most remained farmers, irrigation freed some 30,000 to 40,000 people to pursue other jobs like making clay figurines. but it was not clay sculpture that transformed teotihuacan into an economic superpower. it was another material -- obsidian, a natural volcanic glass whose edge was as sharp as a razor. obsidian was the knife of the ancient world. 30 miles north of teotihuacan, archaeologists have discovered the major source of obsidian in a place called pachuca. this is alejandro pastna of the mexican institute of anthropology and history, and his colleague rafael cruz. they have come here to map the locations of ancient mines. let's go. [ glass crunching ] obsidian fragments litter the surface, the refuse of thousands of years of mining activity. the glass that formed here by nature was especially prized by the ancients because of a unique quality. interpreter: this obsidian was only formed in this deposit. most obsidian is black or gray, but the green
of this great country of ours, every region, small-town, large city, rural areas. but there is something that binds the americans together that i believe is unique among the nation's of the earth, and we are celebrating a part of that you need this today. and so, as we contemplate the future, let us remember that god has not given us the spirit of fear, but of power and of love and of a sound bite. thank you. -- and of a sound mind. thank you. >> thank you, governor strickland. i now ask for a motion to designate the secretary of state as the ex-officio official. >> i moved jon hustend be designated as the axle official secretary of the 53rd electoral college. bemoving that mr. husted designated. all those in favor by seeing aye. opposed? ayes have it. secretary, will you please return to the podium. we elect torrors are about to ct our votes for president of the united states. the procedures are set forth in the 12th amendment. separate of votes are to be taken for each of us on separate ballots. after the votes have been cast and counted and the results announced come electors will sig
developed regulations. i heard the mayor of a fairly large city talk about what he had learned as a mayor. he had been a central government official before and he realized once you got there, a central government officials do not understand a lives of ordinary people. and then he had to watch the proceedings and the process of drafting the local administrative procedure regulation and he came to understand the importance of procedural justice. that was one of the first times in 35 or 40 years of going to china that i heard a chinese talk about procedural justice. the term is in the vocabulary. i think local experimentation may have the least helped in the increment the building of the change of legal culture. >> that is supposed to be one of the virtues of one of the american federal systems. the laboratories of the experiment. one problem with having the population of 1.3 billion, it is a large population. one virtue is that you can divided into provinces and you can have real experiments. try this over here and try that over there. that is a tremendous virtue. i read in your book, you h
of the folks who are assessed in the tourism industry and other at-large participants and they work with the city on -- well, the expansion project. in addition, to the expansion project the assessment district is going to fund a couple other things. it's going to fund a convention sales and marketing. so they'll basically be promoting the convention center to the conventions that exist internationally and nationally and try to lure them to san francisco with some of the funds. they'll have a capital reserve and maintenance reserve for future renovation needs, as well as they operate the assessment district itself. so the construction timeline is 2015 to 2018. and again, the term of district itself for the assessments goes from 2013 to 2045. so with that, i am happy to take questions. it was a really quick and brief overview. i know. but we are really excited to work with the hotels and the tourism and hospitality industry to make this happen. we think this is a really great project for the city because it's improving the city-owned asset, the convention center, as well as increa
until january for the first 6 months of the year so that's where we'll see the large ones, which one largest is the city attorney's office. so we're waiting for that. just kind of a footnote. next meeting we'll be presenting the first iteration of the budget. we are working on requests right now from the various decisions and seeing what their needs are and we are waiting till we have 6 months of revenues in order to do a projection for next fiscal year. as i think you -- as many of you know, we are now doing a two-year budget. we reopen right now the second year, which next year will be the second year, so we start at the point of we proposed this budget and now we can make some changes to it. and the fact that our revenues are coming in higher than we expected gives us some flexibility to do some of the projects that we have been delaying. we will have a special meeting in february to do the, to pass the final budget that's going to be submitted to the mayor's office and the submission date is february 21st. so we have to keep a kind of tight schedule in order to be able to m
easier for small and large contractors to do business in the city. i want to thank monique and the port for their confidence in public works and for the strong relationship and partnership that we forged through completing this project. i'd like to acknowledge the hard work of vortex, [speaker not understood], john miller and alex with vortex. i'd like to thank matt hughey with [speaker not understood], and i'd like to especially thank my public works team, ray louie, laura lombardi, [speaker not understood], and tim o'sullivan. with them i can tackle the most complex project in san francisco. thank you all. (applause) >> so, as you enjoy this space, first of all, please come back. bring your families. bring your friends. we're proud to have another new space for all of the residents and our favorite dogs who walk along here, as well as the many visitors. as you've heard mentioned today, it has taken a huge community of people to get this done. i'm very pleased to see representatives of the fisherman's wharf community benefit district, the fisherman's wharf restaurant association, all t
the concerns and this is one of the sites that we have seen art supplying for large enough and the planning commission approved it on a city wide endeavor with the supervisors and i would like to give kudos david chew and theirs the last at some point i go ahead get to tell you the purple building is a resource we will be loosing that and proposition c limiting the addition of affordable housing that is going to effect thing with the western sonoma plan and so that is unfortunate that, that, path was taken but this is a good project and encourage it.. >> that your commissioners gym meek cofrom south of market and funny finding myself here supporting the recommendation of tim colon and i think serve on board supporting it project it was a unique situation when sandy miller and her class of architecture of students from cal polly were working with task force before still came on the pictures and they had been assigned this very same parking lot and they were created what kind of uses could go there and that is where the whole concept of a mix of uses came from. planning department in these
be if it were launched on the western city of homs in syria. a large swath of the city would be impacted by a single shell. it's estimated 18,000 people would be killed in a day. let's get straight to cnn pentagon correspondent barbara starr. barbara, what have you learned tonight? >> well, you know, as tragic and serious as this is for the people of syria, this now has regional implications throughout the middle east. intelligence services from israel, turkey, jordan, lebanon, all the countries surrounding syria are now talking with the united states around the clock about this very scenario. because if there were to be, god forbid, a chemical attack, the concern is some of that could drift across boreder ed. worse, even as tragic as that would be, what if the regime collapses, terrorists move in, insurgent groups move in and grab some chemical material. they could take it across the borders into the neighbors countries and you would have a full-fledged crisis in the region. >> there has been talk that assad may try and seek asylum. what are you being told about that and the possibiliti
for environmental prize by friends of the urban forest. when mr. early passed in 1998 he bequested five large evergreen trees to the city and those trees were planted at washington square park in may of last year. this legislation again would allow us to accept a gift of this plaque to really commemorate his efforts and what he was able to do to create some greenery in one of the densest and least green spaces in san francisco. >> thank you. so, if there are no questions, let's open it for public comment. is there anyone from the public that would like to speak? seeing none, public comment is closed. so, colleagues, can we move this forward without objection? thank you. and, mr. evans, can you please call item number 2? >> item number 2 is an ordinance amending the san francisco environmental code to suspend the yellow pages distribution pilot program. >> thank you. and the sponsor is president david choo. >> thank you, colleagues. as i mentioned at roll call a couple weeks ago, a year and a half ago, we voted 10 to 1 to approve a three-year pilot program to reduce environmental waste and bli
are no or low cost but others like caa have large potential costs to the city and we didn't do that analysis. >> there is financial considerations. there is political considerations, and so if we have a document -- if we go to the next lafco meeting in january -- whenever it is. we will see the schedule later. it might be too quick to do that in a month and a different resolution for that, but i think that si process that is essential that we go to and provide a road map. >> and the last page in the report and lists the recommendations and near term, mid-term or long-term so the next two to three or three to seven or longer term so we started that work but certainly a lot more to do. >> i also have a question on the emphasis on pg&e and i am wondering if you could talk more about that. i am curious why there is equal treatment of clean power sf and pg&e since you have a program with clean power sf where the city has more control over it and i am wondering if you could talk about that, and by the way was pg&e on the task force? >> yes pg&e was a member of the task force and they did ask at
sets of fences have been damaged. downed trees could be found all over san francisco today. the city received 40 calls of either large downed trees or fallen limb. we found two trouble spots on oak street but neither as serious at the tree that came down on walnut street. it pulled up part othe sidewalk and damaged a car parked on the street. >> obviously disappointing. you got to go with the insurance process and everything. thankfully i'm insured. but as my neighbor put it. you could replace a car. some of these trees have been here 80, 100 years so it's tough on that end as well. >> in addition to downed trees, there were other problems in the city. a power pole snapped, and the northern police station saw serious street flooding which came close to entering the building. the department of public works says all is fine now. live in san francisco, chance chance. >> ama: and right now pg&e is working to restore power to more than 240u7b customers around the bay area. as of this afternoon more than 1240u7b in east bay are without power, and there are more than 4,000 without power on
is highway 101 through the city. this item attributes to several actions. to reflect also the obtainment of a large fta grant. we happily we received a $50 million from the federal transit administration to support the project. part of that funding will be passed over to the authority and part of our previously prop 8 funds will be passed over to mta. this is all to cover some of the work already happened and budgeted for back in the 2010 appropriation as well as reflect the past year. over the past year, the agencies have all done significant work to refine and develop the locally preferred alternative both agencies have been incurred a bit of additional cost. we have also added more consultant support to the budget. the memorandum of agreement will also update the project budget to add about $1.1 million of total project budget to bringing total project cost up to $6.7 million range. again, this additional cost is fully covered by the federal transit administration grant and no additional funding is being sought today. finally this memorandum of agreement, the amendment to this mla pro
will be doing great. the coastal cities, again, largely rain and travel delays will be impacted significantly where we have new york, philly and d.c. >> sounds like retailers can't catch a brick right now. superstorm system and now the storm is barreling its way across the country and with holiday pale at their weakest, heard that this morning, do retailers, can they make up for last yund. >> thank you. have, why don't you go first. what impact is it going to have? >> you have declining dispose al income and petter problems. you have the retailers that have inconspicuous stock and consumers are concerned about everything from hurricane sandy and the senseless slaughters in sandy hook, connecticut, spending less and giving more to charities. >> jan, i don't want to minimize any of this, the damage that this storm has already inflicted in parts of the country and could still inflict, but we were in an environment where people were just not shopping to begin with. do you think retailers could use this as a good excuse going forward? >> yeah, bert's here with me the four horsemen and apocalypse.
guns in their homes. and you can figure out when may not. it is a local new york city wit large circulation, they are saying that the gun control and the happening of newtown, connecticut are in the minds of this readers. so they published a map of where all handgun owners live. on the journal news website, all you have to do is zoom into a neighborhood and the locations of any gun permit holders will show up with red dots tap a dot, and the name and address of the permit holder pop up. the newspaper got the data by filing freedom of information requests with the clerks of the county. they do not indicate whether the residents own the guns just that they are legally able to. and homes are shot guns and rifles are not included because in those counties those can be bought but permits. but the news has brought backlash. the same complaint was made by some readers. i think aforesait was an irresp thing for them the to do. it's saying to robbers go to the home next door, they do not have a gun. or thieves that want to steal the guns will know where to get them. at this store, i spok
highest violent crime rate of any middle to large-sized city in the country. so you've got a couple things here. you have chosen a path. you said you know what? we like the idea that the democrats are giving to us and you have gone down this path for 50 years and you have nothing to show for it but despair. a bailout is not going to solve your problem. think about what you are doing when you go to vote. would a bailout be a gift, with someone saying straighten your life out now. stuart: i agree with you. this is surely a larger picture here. if detroit wants it and appeals to the president to get some money because they voted for the president, what about california? what about illinois? what about any other of the states which voted overwhelmingly for president obama and are in dire financial shape? it could open the door. quick comment? sandra: absolutely. i think this could be the big change over the next four years, if you hear more cries for help, and they don't get it, maybe that's when the republican party starts to look pretty good. stuart: that will be interesting. next we will sh
still has a huge presence in baghdad. the u.s. embassy there is as large as vatican city with almost 200 american troops providing embassy security and handling sales of u.s. arms to the iraqis. it may be a preview of the future of afghanistan in which the united states is pushing ahead with plans to withdraw troops by 2014. the defense secretary leon panetta says our longest war is at a strategic turning point with a new strategy which has reversed five-year trends of growing violence. he says military commanders there are now expressing optimism. >> all of them believe that we have fundamentally turned the tide in that effort after years in which we lacked the right strategy and the necessary resources to try to achieve the mission we were embarked on. >> shepard: the u.s. still has about 65,000 troops in afghanistan. >>> secretary panetta is talking about the attack object the u.s. outpost in benghazi just hours after more classified hearings on capitol hill. that attack killed the u.s. ambassador to libya, chris stevens and three other americans. now the state department is sending l
in bethesda but the wider washington area? >> i think the washington area as one of the greatest cities in the country, probably the world. as large as it is and powerful it is because of the federal government it is still very community focus. therere are very few people that i or my fellow of the directors did not know. so, the opportunity to meet people is constant. there are many nights i am out meeting with people. as big of a community it is, it really is a small community. now we are actively expanding into the northern virginia marketplace and we are really replicating exactly whwhat we did 14 years ago in montgomery county and i it is a new challenge for us to be able to get to know the people in northern virginia, which we feel is a terrific opportunity. >> said irk you that a town -- doesn't work you in any way in a town that has so many business leaders, who make up the business community, that it gets overshadowed by being the nation's capital and the fedal governmentnt -- sometimes is seen as a one-industry to? an interesting you bring it up. we do a lot ofoad shows in th
.m. a large area, but not the city or southern or eastern suburbs. the area in blue denotes the snow. the light blue is very light snow. a little purple mix, and then the green is rain. we're on track forecasting snow north and west of the city. mostly rain south and east of the city before wraps up in the afternoon. by the time it wraps up, we may see an inch or so in the metro area. to adjust to4 inches it will turn wendy and a lot cooler the day on it will turn wendyindy and cold on sunday. next seven days shows a sunny and cold new year's eve, a cold new year's day with a chance of a few showers. let's go live to the white house with president obama. >> for the past couple of months, i've been working with leaders of both parties to try to forge an agreement to build our economy and shrink the deficit. the ballast planned and cut spending in a responsible way that would also ask the wealthiest americans to pay a little more. i still want to get this done. it is the right thing to do for families, our businesses, and our entire economy. but the allure for immediate action is here
sets that have already been put out there, but by and large the data sets put out by city government are data sets that i think show us in a very positive way. from my perspective, it's important for us to keep on pushing data sets that allow us to deal with the sometimes imperfections in city government. to figure it out, where it is we need to take risks, we are we can be more entrepreneurial, where we can be more transparent and frank little more accountable to all of you as the residents and as our customers here in city government. and this is why i am proud tomorrow to help move forward legislation that my staff has been working closely with jay nath and mayor leon that will real i do three things. first of all, it will create a chief data officer because we need one person who is responsible and accountable for moving forward our open data agenda. secondly, we're going to require every department in the city to have a representative who is responsible for data so you can go to our transit agency, our police department, any of our 50 plus departments and know who can help you g
a largely black city, you saw folks going out to the suburbs. dollars going with them. that's the struggle. >> it's a struggle, but is the message at the end of your film hopeful or depressing? >> well, it's realistic. we're not saying that detroit is over, it can't rise again. we're saying please double down on detroit. please focus on a lot of us our cities going bankrupt and infrastructural problems in detroit. it's not a message of it's all going to be fine but if people ban together and we focus on places like detroit, of course, there's hope. >> you talk to so many people that are struggling. what did they say they want to get done and how do they expect it to get done? >> they want basic -- i think they want a basic quality of life. they really do. at this point it's donning on them that it's never going to be the way it used to be but they want to have a basic life and that their kids will have at least as good a life as they have. >> what we're seeing in greece is what's happening in detroit. austerity cuts. >> we're seeing a big bailout -- >> right. >> starting with the auto indu
to leverage that in the program to result in private investment and here in the city and those are really important to get the large scale renewable energy generation and additionally we might be able to use the program to efficient these programs and similar programs and it could be an important piece of getting to that 100% goal. >> in terms of the renewable energy study what's the next step. >> so we presented this to the mayor last week and he is very interested in moving forward and particular on some of the legislative pieces, and starting to -- for example, the example of pace into the federal legislative agenda and looking at supporting whether it's community or other pieces at the state level so we're talking about that as that legislative agenda comes up. we have the task force there. they're happy to continue their work. they really enjoyed being part of this work and so close in step with the city so they are available and willing to move forward. we at the department are moving forward on a number of these recommendations which are in the full task force and our u.s. depa
have adopted the regulations, namely -- and i went there and heard the mayor of a fairly large city talk at what he had learned as a mayor. he'd been a central government official before he was posted down and he realized once he got there, the central government officials don't really understand the lives of ordinary people. and then he began to watch the proceedings, the process of drafting the local administrative procedure regulation, and he came to understand the importance of procedural justice that was one of the first times in 35, 40 years of going to china at her to chinese talk about procedural justice. i think that the term is in the vocabulary, and i think that local experimentation may at least help in the incremental building of a changed legal culture. >> that is supposed to be one of the virtues of the american federal system, is called the brandeis, called the laboratories of experiment. now, one problem with having the population of 1.3 billion is it a very big population. it's hard to govern. at one virtue of is you can divide into parts and provinces, and you rea
and with all of its services and amendies, adjacent to it, is the large tower. the tower of course is a key participant in the financial district of san francisco and we think that it represents the best thinking in the united states about transit-based development. the transit city tower is on mission street. it is address will be 101 first. and i will show you in a few minutes how that is going to be worked out. it is just north of the transit center itself. connects at the roof top park and also surrounded by greenry, and particularly on the eastern side, is a place called mission square. when will be a beautiful park, entrance to the tower as well as the transit center. here you see the ground floor of the transit center itself. it is designed to be a permeable building. the tower works directly with what we call the grand hall. that is the main space of the center, in a perfect kind of compliment to each other of activities and address and support and even security and i will go into that in some detail. this street level is cut through the grand hall and the bus deck above that and th
show these underwater creatures draw large crowds, drive more than $300 million to the city and state and help maintain over 3300 jobs. >> it helps us to understand really the impact that we're making in the community. >> reporter: the aquarium commission report comes just as the nonprofit receives a grant from the state to help renovate its rate trade exhibit. >> the 2.5 million dollars that the state made available to us, to help support that project is very, very important. to us, remaining vital and relevant. really providing new things for our visitors. >> the report also shows that after people who come to the national aquarium annually. >> what does that mean for marylanders? how do they benefit? >> because people are coming from out of town, money that they earn elsewhere that they're spending here. so everyone from maryland benefits from that. >> reporter: translation, out- of-towners spend money funneled right back here to our city. our very own backyard. >> and because there have been so many out-of-towners visiting the aquarium
we'll be constructing? >> they are definitely expanding in different cities, yes. so that is a large part of why this is necessary. they have done exhaustive research at the san francisco travels, what is needed? and met with and had many many focus meetings with industry leaders around what is required to support the convention industry. so the design is being very tailored to meet exactly -- they have lots of survey responses as well, as what is required here? we have a lot of seats here. people want to come here. we have one of the highest demand convention centers because they want to be in san francisco. but it's our facility size that is limiting us right now. >> thank you. >> commissioner riley? >> hi. you mentioned the projected occupancy would be at 87.6% when the expansion was done. so what is the current occupancy? >> i believe it's around 80%. let me see if i can find that for you as well. i don't have all the statistics on the tourism industry. i'm sorry. >> that is all right. thank you. >> i'm more of the finance person on the project, but i co
the wind and rain. city crews work into the night cutting tree that toppled as a this tree started making cracking noises at 5:00 a.m. in front of rob porter's home. >> and then there was a large -- probably five minutes after the crack lig, a huge thud. >> in all the department of public works cleaned up the trees. it is real busy. >> this latest storm spared no neighborhood. it was snapped near moraga street. there was sig president cay -- significant street flooding. two large branches landed on one of the thoroughfares. and in city heights, a tree uprooted taking part of the street with it. a prius on the street was also damaged. >> you can replace a car, and some of the streets have been here 80 years. >> despite the loss of some trees, the city says thankfully there was little property damage and no injuries. although at this home, the family dog did come close to getting hurt. a large tree belonging to the house two doors down came crashing down on their backyard. >> i was thankful it didn't land on my dog. that would be tragic. i am glad he ran. he has big, long legs so he could r
, abc7 news. >>> city crews in lafayette resume work this morning on a large hole on a street that may take days to fix. the sinkhole is on mountain view drive near mount diablo boulevard created by vol len creek interest yesterday's huge storm it began flowing into the neighborhood after piles of large debris clogged up the culvert washed await earth between culvert and the road when the road collapsed it snapped off a water service line, a sueage line and badly damaged a water main -- sewage line and badly damaged a water main. amy hollyfield will have a live report in the next half hour. >>> this morning road crews in santa cruz county assessing damage of a washed out road. this photo of vine hill road near camino vista the road is closed in both directions. manager says it is not clear how long it is going to take to repair the closure will be long term. two other rock sides on highway 17 yesterday morning were -- rock slides on highway 17 yesterday morning were cleared by afternoon. >>> middle school in fairfax suffered significant flooding. the school library was flooded and ther
before the city gives the go ahead in large scale parks. they intro use ited a proposal to hold special informational hearings to run for more than 48 hours. back in october, he criticized the mobile lacrosse event for 25 weeks. they are making the holidays brighter for some bay area children. giants held their annual party at at&t park for the homeless shelters and certain programs, santa handed out gifts with some help from sergio romo. >> i don't have the money to give my kids gifts so i come to parties and they have gifts. >> the children were also treated to face painting and pizza and we have posted more on the giant's holiday party including interviews and we will find that on our hot topic section. let's go back to sal and hopefully they have cleared up any issues that have been cleared overnight. >> wet roads, you might want to give yourself extra time as you drive on 280 as 217 and we have just a few minor things which have cleared up quickly. traffic on the sunole grade is clear and an extra ten minutes might give you some extra time out there. >>> it is going to be more of a
waste away from the hub of civilization, which enabled cities to grow. . >> you have a large bowl, a drive motor and another motor with a planetary gearbox with differential pressure inside there. the large mass up there spinning separating the solids from the liquid. we have to prevent about once a month, we go in there grease those, change the oil, check the vibration levels. the operators can tell just by the hum of that machine that it's a harmonic noise emitted that it's out of balance and the machine needs to be cleaned. it will start vibrating and we have vibration analysis machines that will come over here and check the levels. so it's kind of an on-going thing that you have to stay on top of on a daily basis. >> handled properly, you take organic residuals, as we call them, that are leftovers of our society and turn them back into some energy. and we have another ability to take that sludge and get a nutrient value for crops there. we actually are running a kind of composting energy recovery system. >> well, this is a dirty job. we try to do it safely and we try to do it
patriotic types, right wing. for the most part are completely groundless. in this community, in the city, veterans by and large were warmly embraced. when they had true problems, when they were in dire need and no one else is taking care of them, not their families, not their peashooter tapes. this san francisco to take care of these men. >> i really wanted to reinforce that david. the haight-ashbury clinic with its nonjudgmental approach, although that's in the 70s came to her clinic for detox and medical problems and the va decided they needed to find where ever the vets went and that is when the haight-ashbury got their first-ever government funding. government officials came across an wanted to give me money. i said last year you try to arrest me and i'd like to give me money. it was a vietnam vet. it has a very rich history. the head with glen ross whittaker came out a vietnam vet area, country joe and the fish. it really caught violence over here on haight streak come attack court came down. i can just see it right now they have this big shields. they beat the out of all the hippie
little protection the rack offered. >> we had a ton of debris come down, large log six sections. there is a bureau sitting in the creek. >> the city faces damage estimates in six figures. greg arthur's curiosity pulled this landscape architect from his office. >> i am always curious when water moves and soil moves what causes it to happen. >> prevention may come from city and neighborhood effort. >> it is an on going thing. just like your backyard. you have to clean your leaves. the creeks are the same. >> this road will remain closed until early summer when a permanent storm drain and new road can be built. jay hernandez, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> ahead, the procedural slipup that may have contributed to a crash sent three firefighters to the hospital. >>> police say a woman in a wheel share was injured when she was hit by a light rail vehicle at 5:45 at the intersection of market and church street. the extent of the injuries are not known. we do know traffic is affected in the area. we have a crew on the way. we will bring you more information during this newscast as it becomes
the vapor with a long sweep of his arms. mark twain had acquired a steam bath in virginia city. while laboring under bronchitis and a series called, 8 miles northwest from the road between virginia city and steamboat springs, a distance of 7 miles. over a long line of beautiful columns, there was a large house constructed to be then. [inaudible] gave me a boiling and surging noise exactly as a steam steamboat bed. sawyer traded and a hot mess. the boards were damp from the sweat running down his arms. in his 32 years, sawyer had been a torch boy. new york engine company number 14. san francisco had grown and battled fire under chief david broderick and first fire chief. he served with other engine houses and toiled as a steamboat engineer in the mexican tea tray. mark twain, who held strong opinions perked up when sawyer mentioned he had worked as a steamboat engineer. the question and the boy in the steamer environment, such a job, he said knowingly. in the boiling steam room, he pointed out the suffocating temperature of the furnace room in a narrow space between two rows of furnace
serving sector of the economy which has largely declined in recent years and what is your plan to create wage jobs in industries to prevent the city's work class from being displaced for the newer upper increase jobs and the high-tech jobs financial and provision service cities? >>> thank you supervisor and i'm glad to here and i join you in the effort of using social media to community with our constituent. >> let me start by saying that we have come off of the worst economic downturn when i took office last year the unemployment rate was 9.6%. that has now changed to eight% since 2011 and that is growing at a 6.6% pace, there are still more than 32,000 unemployed san franciscoians which i find unacceptable and we must do better i want to spill investor confidence and show businesses of all sites that we can start stay here. this year we are reformed from payroll tax and i heard that previous payroll tax hurt job growth and i agreed and propyl vision e was passed this last november and because of proposition e san francisco standards to ads more new private sector jobs and that is
are for government entities other than the city when they operate a parking location for themselves. this does not apply to third party operates that are contracted by government entities. and the large reason for this is that if a government entity has costs of compliance, they may be able to deduct that from the taxes that they remit to the city. so we found we would much rather have them remit the taxes rather than deduct the cost of compliance. >> any commissioner comments? commissioner ortiz? >> thank you. this is amazing legislation. i think it will really help small business. i had a couple of questions. if a school, let's say, everett during gay pride and awful, that they have parking. they do it themselves. are they required to go through the process of getting the permits and everything, even it's a one-day use? >> you are talking about like a san francisco unified school district? >> yes. >> there was prior legislation that handled this issue, where if there is a completely volunteer-run operation, that is on a san francisco unified school site, they may get a permit through
lake city are seeing it, and does have impact and the impact is largely i would say it creates a sense of agreement. the biggest thing that bully does or the big service the film has is gives everyone a unified collective science of agreement to which they roll up the sleeves and get busy creating change and has been really exciting. i building we already i believe kroshed the threshold of 140,000 students nationwide and we are working to get to the million and the idea is a million is a tipping point . a million kids in america. that's like one in ten basically in public schools. that gets embedded so over time every september schools are starting with that method to have that agreement, and along the way we're also trying to deliver youth action and educate ideas and teach the schools and districts about social emotional learning because after they see the film they want to know what do we do next? how do we impact that? and that's what i am up to and it's great to be here. >> thanks so much for coming here. we appreciate it. [applause] >> good afternoon everyone. i am rach
of debris from drainage pipe that carry storm water to the lower level of the city. trying to prevent a large back that up could unleash a torrent of potentially destructive water. >> more than anything we have seen in the last 15 years. saturation levels in the hillside creating a lot of flow throughout the lower levels. >>reporter: nearby there has been a nagging flow of water through frank hererra sky light into the kitchen. >> call the contractor hope to get him over here next day to see what he has to say and hopefully they can order up a new part. the tarp is coming. before the next storm definitely. >>reporter: only kern boulevard they scrape out junk and the metal great id that goes that the station. >> gets full of grass and clean it tout make sure the pump able to run. >>reporter: the pump take all the run off from city streets and flush it into the bay. willow tree topple on hillside on valley view avenue. wasn't particularly big but the branches may have created a natural dam lead ing into a drain pipe. >> always looks better than a fallen down tree. they just recent
and those are the funds that make improvements and make streets better. it's a large chunk of money over the same period of time that obag is providing. the department of public works working with other city department is committed to complete streets. we feel it vital to make the investment . we need to spend even more money just on repaving. the amount of money that we need to meet those commitments is included in the masonic project and broadway project. to meet that commitment, we will need all of them. we will be working with the t.a. staff and especially with the other agencies applied for obag funds in order to make sure we're meeting all of those needs. thanks. >> thank you. >> right now we're over subscribed. what we will actually heard a lot of concerns that you've spoken about today. we are going to look at each the projects. get better refined cost estimates. look to see if there are other sources to still keep us on schedule that deliver the projects that we committed. and move forward on this entire package of projects. i think we're going to try to do that in the next coup
home because we use the internet. what we used to do was carry the large maps and it took a long time to find the information. >> it saves the city time and money. you are not taking up the time of a particular employee at the assessor's office. you might be doing things more efficient. >> they have it ready to go and say, this is what i want. >> they are finding the same things happening on the phone where people call in and ask, how do i find this information? we say, go to this website and they go and get the information easily. >> a picture tells a thousand stories. some say a map >> good afternoon everyone and welcome to the november 30, 2012 -- i'm sorry december 7, 2012 meeting of the local agency formation commission. my name is david campos and i am the chair of the commission. we are joined by the clerk linda wong and i want to thank the san francisco gtv staff for the coverage of this meeting. madam clerk, if you can please call item number two, roll call. >> supervisor avalos, absent. supervisor olague. >> here. >> supervisor -- i'm sorry, commissioner schmeltzer. >
what we used to do was carry the large maps and it took a long time to find the information. >> it saves the city time and money. you are not taking up the time of a particular employee at the assessor's office. you might be doing things more efficient. >> they have it ready to go and say, this is what i want. >> they are finding the same things happening on the phone where people call in and ask, how do i find this information? we say, go to this website and they go and get the information easily. >> a picture tells a thousand stories. some say a map >> good afternoon ladies and gentlemen. for those that haven't please take your seats. again we so appreciate you all gathering on today's peace sunday. we appreciate you taking the time. we are certainly grateful for the special guest which we will come to momentarily. let me dispense with some of the acknowledgments on the on set and grateful to our mayor and our city officials who are here, chief wendy steel, and those from juvenile probation, commanders and briefs and we appreciate each of the city leaders being wit
put up to protect city residents, visitors and the park land during the construction. this is a very large event with very large heavy machinery operating throughout various times of the event. and fencing is frankly required, as it would be at any construction site, during the build and the tear down. in recent years we've actually encouraged another planet to be more deliberate during the construction of the events, whereas three years ago we began the construction on the friday before the event. our gardeners over the last few years have advocated for us to begin that construction a couple days earlier so that it can go at a slower pace and we can be ensured the park is protected better. we do work to minimize the impact of the fencing. it is phased, the construction, so it begins in the polo fields and expands out into the surrounding meadows as the construction begins in those meadows. we do work after the event to then phase the breakdown so that the breakdown happens in that surrounding meadows, first in those meadows reopen to the public first, and it is completed lastly at t
taking over a large percentage of our city. a lot of it was non for profits. i have had a good working relationship with people in the state governments. it is good to have them close. i can see what they're doing and to buy and put and see what i can do for the people of the city. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] host: we turn our attention to unemployment insurance and how it can be impacted. joining us for the discussion is josh . caller: it is a combination of a federal and state program. it usually lasts -- it can be extended up to 93 weeks. it is the extension be on the six month time frame we're talking about as part of the fiscal cliff tops. host: that is what might be caught -- cut? guest: that is what automatically expires. president obama has said as part of the deal i want to make, the benefits should continue. republicans have not taken a firm stand. we have seen in the past obama has had to make a deal on taxes. host: what specific benefits do these programs provide? guest: usually some kind o
this is after they began to develop some homesteading entries. >> it was a large chicken ranch out there. lawson chicken ranch was along 19th ave. >> [inaudible] >> not exactly. he donated the land later to the city, though. sort of the farm house feeling of the richmond. >> there is a water tower with a windmill in the back. >> right, get your water from wells. that was the early boathouses. looking at that map, sporting men would come out in the horses, have little races with their horses and carriages and the sea horse races, maybe get in a card game, have a drink of the way to the beach. >> but this was when there was county land, so there was no gambling. the move people out to county for the race track. >> they were away from intense public scrutiny out there. >> my of the state is there were four racetracks in the city. -- my understanding. can you name them? >> pioneer, union, in the side, and oceanside. >> there ago. maybe there are more. >> we have a big article on race tracks on our website. outsidelands.org. >> the ingleside, you can still see that. >> they developed where that race
districts. there are issues around displacement, the impact of a large hospital on the surrounding neighborhoods, and whether the size of this hospital and plans in the city wide picture of health care access. i am sure we will have robust discussion about this in the coming months. >> are there any other issues that concern you that we have not discussed? are there any other interests you plan to concentrate on as supervisor? >> one thing every supervisor works on is the relationship between our neighborhoods and city hall. i am blessed in district 3 to have a rich network of neighborhood associations, merchant groups, and nonprofit organizations that i interface with regularly. they often had difficulty navigating city hall. i am trying to help develop neighborhood councils that bring together these various groups to interface with city hall and city staff as a model to foster partnerships between and our neighborhoods and city government. it is a model we have been working on for a couple of years in district 3. i hope to replicate it to out san francisco fairly soon. >> we are
it is to serves as the transportation director in this great city. we ordered san francisco weather to deep the dust down and we are in a construction site and it's a great time for transportation across the nation largely because of some of the folks you will hear who are to my left and your right. it is also a great time to be in san francisco because we have leadership here in the city that are encouraging innovation, that recognize the importance of investment and infrastructure, and there is no better manifestation of that than this project and that prt is man manifested in a way that i can see no more strongly in our great mayor who have been been a public works director, a city administrator, and helped build the city's plan he really gets this stuff. he is really engaged in this stuff. i don't think a week has come gone by that he hasn't asked me when this day is coming and it's a pleasure to introduce our mayor ed lee. >> thank you for your wonderful leadership. over 20-25 years ago when we were struggling with the earthquake, when people in chinatown said "gosh we're really go
army is trying to organize the tent city, but they lack the money, experience, and personnel to take care of such a large group of people. >> from morning at 7:00 evening, this is for five people, for a family. >> he is living with his family of 17 in an old tent. >> the rain was terrible. everything -- really everything got wet. even our mattresses. hopefully, my children will not get sick, too. >> basil is trying to provide the children at the camp with education, teaching them how to read, write, and drop. the children's drawings illustrate the impact of the war on their lives and the months many have spent in the camp. >> this is the helicopter of b ashar al assad. until a few months ago, about 5000 people live here. now there are four times that number. the refugees are glad to have a roof over their heads. osama hassan from aleppo spent months in a tent. >> i just wanted to get over the border. a turkish border soldiers shot me in the leg without warning. they are not letting anyone through any more. >> it is hard for the syrian air force because of its proximity to the border.
Search Results 100 to 199 of about 499 (some duplicates have been removed)